Saturday, 27 May 2017

New Ulterior Motive Cards!

Just a heads-up to all of the Frostgrave fans.

The new issue of Miniature Wargames (#410) contains a short interview in which editor John Treadaway asks me about the new Ulterior Motives expansion. More importantly, the interview also comes with two new, exclusive Ulterior Motive cards.

Now, I admit, it is going to take some creativity to figure out how to use these, since they are obviously printed on paper instead of card and have no back. Still, wargamers are a creative lot, so I have no doubt players will figure something out!


Thursday, 25 May 2017

My New Job: Wargames Developer

In the seven years I have been running this blog, I have tried to keep it separate from my day job. The Renaissance Troll has always been a place for me to ramble on about my thoughts, projects, and hobbies. For the most part, it has been a wargaming blog, as that has been my main hobby for the last decade or so.

As the years have gone by, however, the line between my hobby and my job has blurred. With the publication of Frostgrave two years ago, the line grew even murkier. Now I’ve pretty much gone and done away with the line completely.

In a few weeks I will be closing the book on my time as the Marketing Manager for Osprey Games. Instead, I will be taking a part-time, work-from-home position in the new role as the Wargames Developer for Osprey Games. In this position I will be working directly with the Head of Osprey Games on developing new wargaming systems and products that will be owned and controlled by Osprey Games. For the most part, I will be writing and testing wargames rules. At this point I can’t talk about any of the projects I will be working on. That said, people who follow Osprey Games can probably make a pretty good guess about my first area of work...

So, what does this mean for the world of Frostgrave? Well, it’s good news actually.  As I said, my new job is only a part-time position. The rest of my time will be spent as a freelance writer, and I will continue to work on Frostgrave in that capacity. This should mean that I actually have more time to spend on the game. It will also hopefully mean that I will have more time to explore other writing opportunities.

I am about to take a bit of a step into the unknown, and the new job is only one part of the life-change about to happen. There will be other things to talk about soon.

It’s all a tad scary, but with change, comes excitement, and I am very excited to get started in my new work.

What does this mean for The Renaissance Troll? Honestly, I have no idea.

Sunday, 2 April 2017

Frostgrave: Let’s Talk Spellcasting Experience Points

About a year ago, I wrote a blog post talking about experience points in Frostgrave and some thoughts I had for changing the system. I got a great response to that post, which has helped push my thinking forward. In fact, I have decided that I am going to include an ‘Alternate Experience Points System’ in a Frostgrave supplement that is coming out next year. I just haven’t completely decided what it is going to include!

My biggest mental stumbling block continues to be experience points for spellcasting. Right now, a wizard receives 10 experience points for every spell he successfully casts. The more I have thought about this, the more I am convinced that it is both a good and bad piece of game design.

It is good in that it encourages spellcasting, which is what the game is primarily about. Also, players are rewarded for ‘accomplishing’ which feels right.

It is bad because it encourages a player to cast his or her easiest spell repeatedly, which detracts from the magical diversity of the game and lessens tactical interest. Additionally, as a wizard gets better, that one spell will get easier to cast, making experience points more likely and potentially creating an experience imbalance between players who use just one spell and those who like to use a range of spells. I don’t think this last point is a major issue, but it is an area for improvement.

So, here are two potential solutions I came up with in my musings on the problem. Both of them address the bad points of the current system, but also have an issue of their own!

Experience Points Based on Casting Number


Under this system, whenever a wizard successfully casts a spell, he or she would receive a number of experience points equal to the Casting Number for the spell. So, if a starting Necromancer casts Bone Dart (as so many of them do), they would receive 8 experience points, as that would be their starting Casting Number. If the Necromancer later decreases his Casting Number to 7, he would receive 7 experience points every time he successfully casts the spell.

There is an elegance to this system that I find very appealing. Players still receive experience for accomplishing, but the reward actually matches the level of accomplishment. It eliminates the problem of wizards cranking out experience for casting easy spells. It also gives a little bit of encouragement for wizards to cast their harder spells.

The only real drawback I see to this system is that it requires more paperwork and more math. Not a huge amount, in truth, but... time and time again, I have seen people say that one of the main reasons they find Frostgrave appealing, is that it is simple. This change would only increase the complexity by a small amount, but how many of these small changes can you make before a ‘simple’ system becomes ‘complex’?

If Frostgrave were a role-playing game, I would most likely use this system. As a ‘simple’ warmgame, I remain unsure.

Experience Points for Failure


I recently heard someone suggest that when considering a problem, it is often useful to ask yourself ‘what if I did the exact opposite?’. So, what if wizards earned 10 experience points every time they failed to cast a spell...

Actually, this is really interesting from a game design point of view. Once again it encourages players to attempt to cast their harder spells; though I suspect, more than any other system, it encourages players to attempt the ‘best’ spell for a given situation, which should lead to the best ‘game’. Beyond that though, it brings an entirely new element of balance to the game. Players that are failing to cast spells are less likely to secure treasure. Thus, they will be falling behind in the wealth and experience point race. Under this system, the failing spellcaster would be compensated by receiving more experience from failed spells.

In pure game mechanics terms, this system has a huge amount to offer. The problem is – it feels wrong to reward failure, and I suspect most players wouldn’t like it. I don’t know of any wargame or rpg that works this way. So, either this is a rather new and original idea – or it is just a bad idea that others have thought about and rejected.

I would be very interested to hear what other Frostgrave players think. Please comment below with any thoughts, suggestions, or original ideas that I can steal...

Thursday, 16 March 2017

Play-Test Fun



























Hopefully there will be a bit of good news coming soon for fans of 'Warriors of Athena'.

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Kornovik, Barbarian Outcast

Frostgrave just got a new 'coolest' minaiture...



























Last week I received an advance-casting of the newest Frostgrave miniature, and it is, by far, the largest model in the range. It is hoped that a limited number of these will be available for purchase at Salute, before the model goes on regular release later in the year. I don't have any details on pricing yet.

The miniature is cast in resin and came in about a dozen pieces, but thanks to the well thought-out design, all of the pieces fit together perfectly with no trouble at all. The model comes with a scenic base, but I prefer my minis on round bases.

It's actually a fun little story how this miniature came to be. Back before I had written the first word of Forgotten Pacts, I had to turn in an 'artwork brief' for the cover. I knew I wanted barbarians looking down on part of the city, but then, for reasons I can't remember, I decided to have one of them riding a giant woolly rhinoceros. In retrospect, why would I not want a woolly rhinoceros.

Dmitry Burmak did his usual amazing job and took my vague brief and delivered another great cover, including a barbarian chief riding a super cool rhino. When the cover went live, it prompted a lot of comments and excitement that the supplement would include rules for mounted soldiers. I didn't want to disappoint people, but I had already decided that I was not going to include rules for mounts - partly because I don't think they generally belong in the Frozen City, but also because I haven't yet found a way to make such rules work (yet).

Instead, I decided I would work the guy on the cover into the book as a special character, and thus, Kornovik, the Barbarian Outcast was born. And there, I thought the matter would rest.

Then Nick Eyre over at North Star starts wondering if Kornovik should have his own miniature. Phil Smith at Osprey thinks he should. Nick spoke to Giorgio Bassani, who sculpted all of the Frostgrave barbarians for Forgotten Pacts. Giorgio said he would like to give it a try, but that he'd like to CAD sculpt it (for us Luddites, that basically means sculpt it on a computer). Since all of the previous figures in the range had been traditionally sculpted, no one was quite sure about this...

However, Giorgio went ahead and started, and it became clear, pretty early, that he both he and the computer program were up to the challenge. He had to make a few changes from the guy depicted on the cover. For one thing, he had to give him a bow, since I'd given Kornovik one in the rules. He also put him in a more battle-ready stance.

Now, I'm lucky enough to have one of the first Kornovik models in existence. I can't wait to get a paint brush on him!

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Victory's Knife on Amazon

My fantasy, fiction anthology Victory's Knife is now available on Amazon as both a Kindle ebook and a print-on-demand paperback. (I have ordered a copy of the later, but have no seen it, so I can't comment on the printing quality yet).

If you are in the UK you can find it at these links:

Kindle

Print-On-Demand

For those ordering on Amazon.com you can find it here:

Kindle

Print-On-Demand